Tag: Islamic State

Government to move Abu Bakar Bashir to a Central Java prison

The Indonesian government will move ailing radical cleric Abu Bakar Bashir to a prison near his hometown in Solo, Central Java for humanitarian reason.

“[The decision] is final. We’ll just need to move him to Central Java,” chief security minister Wiranto told journalists on Wednesday.


On Tuesday, Wiranto said the government has made the decision by taking into account the firebrand cleric’s old age and poor health without compromising the legal and security aspects. He also said that Bashir will have access to medical treatment and if necessary, the government will take him to the hospital “using a helicopter”.

Bashir will be moved from his isolation cell in Gunung Sindur prison in Bogor, West Java to a prison near Klaten in Central Java where  he can be close to his family.

Earlier in the week, Ministry of Justice and Human Rights said Bashir is ineligible for house arrest. It was one of the options the government said it was considering as leniency to the ailing cleric.

“House arrest is only available for a defendant who is standing trial, while Bashir is no longer a defendant. He is a prisoner, convicted to serve time in prison,” Ade Kusmanto, a spokesman for the ministry’s Directorate General of Correction said.

Last week, Defense Minister Ryamizard Ryacudu told journalists at the state palace that house arrest for the cleric is very likely, as the government is weighing up which form of clemency it could give to Bashir. The cleric suffers from pooling of blood on his legs, a condition which requires him to undergo regular medical check-ups.

On Mar. 1, Bashir was taken to a hospital in Jakarta for treatment which his lawyer, Achmad Michdan, said had been scheduled for Nov. 2017. He is scheduled for another check up on Thursday.

President Joko Widodo said the government gave permission for Bashir to go to the hospital on humanitarian grounds.

Kusmanto said the cleric can ask the president for clemency, given that he is in poor health and will become an octogenarian this year. Another possibility is to demand parole, for which he will be eligible in June 2019 when he will have served two-thirds of his 15-year prison sentence.

Michdan said his client rules out both the options since applying for either one would mean that Bashir pleads guilty to the charges against him.

Bashir was convicted in 2011 for supporting paramilitary training in Aceh, and the firebrand cleric is described as the ideological icon of Jamaah Islamiyah (JI), including those who carried out bomb attacks in Bali in 2003.

“Bashir believes he is innocent because he was merely observing his faith as a Muslim. He was collecting money to fund training and travel for those who wanted to go as mujahideen to Palestine. He wasn’t rebelling against the country,” Michdan said.

Michdan said that it should be possible for the government to “relocate the place” where Bashir serves his sentence from Gunung Sindur prison to his house in Solo, Central Java.

He cited examples of jailed former Jakarta governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, who is serving his two-year sentence for blasphemy at a special police detention instead of a correctional facility, and East Timor resistance fighter Xanana Gusmao who had been imprisoned in Jakarta when he was fighting for East Timor’s independence from Indonesia. He was then confined to a house in Central Jakarta in 1999.

Terrorism analyst Adhe Bakti said even though house arrest is not regulated in the Criminal Procedures Code, Gusmao’s case was laden with political context at that time when East Timor was going for a referendum in which they voted for independence from Indonesia on Aug. 30, 1999.

“But the government could make a breakthrough by giving Bashir leniency to serve the rest of his sentence on house isolation based on humanitarian grounds. At least it would project a positive image of the government before the Islamists,” Bakti said.

Bakti warned that isolation remains necessary given Bashir’s revered position among militants.

“Even though he is no longer affiliated with ISIS, he still very much identified with radical teaching,” Bakti said.

This story has been updated from its original version in Arab News

Failed Indonesian suicide bomber who attacked priest not lone wolf

A failed suicide bomber who attempted to attack a priest during a Sunday church service in Medan, the capital of Indonesia’s North Sumatra province, confessed that he was not working alone, police said.

“The perpetrator confessed during police interrogation that someone else had ordered him to carry out the attack,” North Sumatra police spokeswoman Senior Commissioner Rina Sari Ginting said.

The assailant tried to stab Father Albert Pandiangan with an axe when the priest was standing at the pulpit, but the 60-year-old priest of Saint Joseph Catholic Church only received a minor stab wound on his left arm, the spokeswoman said.

A picture of the assailant’s identity card provided by the police identified him as 18-year-old Ivan Armadi Hasugian. Ginting said the police were searching Hasugian’s house to search for any explosive materials.

Based on an account by a member of the congregation, Nana Manullang, the perpetrator was sitting among worshippers when he prepared something that resembled a makeshift bomb, Ginting said.

Manullang, who was sitting next to Hasugian during the service, told the police she saw batteries and pipes in the teenager’s backpack. He then stood up and his backpack produced fumes, a low explosive sound and sparks.

But it didn’t stop the perpetrator to run towards the priest and attack him.

“The pastor managed to escape as the congregation restrained [the attacker],” Ginting said, adding that none of the congregation members were hurt.

Police vacated the church and secured the surrounding area to search for more evidence.

They also confiscated Hasugian’s backpack, which contained a knife, a homemade bomb and an item that displayed a logo resembling the flag of the Islamic State, but the police did not provide details whether the motive for the attack was linked to the terrorist group.

Medan church attack2

Results of a survey conducted by the Wahid Foundation in cooperation with the Indonesia Survey Institute (LSI) revealed that of 1,520 respondents across Indonesia’s 34 provinces, 72 percent of them admitted of not being radical or unwilling to be radical, while 7.7 percent admitted to willing to be radical and 0.4 percent admitted to have been involved in radical actions.

The survey, which was released on August 1, defined potential for being radicalized as participation or willingness to participate in actions that involved violence in the name of religion, namely demonstrating against groups deemed against Islamic values or launching attacks to other religions’ houses of worship.

At the heart of Europe, Indonesian oversees a Saudi mosque

Jakarta/Brussels – Syarif Abdullah Alqadrie was driving to work when a bomb went off at Zaventem airport last month. By the time the Indonesian arrived at the Great Mosque of Brussels, where he is an administrator, a second bomb exploded at the Maelbeek metro station. Continue reading “At the heart of Europe, Indonesian oversees a Saudi mosque”

Counter-terrorism agency monitoring two pilots over alleged support for Islamic State

Indonesia’s counter-terrorism agency said it had been monitoring two pilots for six months over their apparent support for Islamic State. Continue reading “Counter-terrorism agency monitoring two pilots over alleged support for Islamic State”

Authorities trying to talk Aceh rebels out of joining Islamic State

Authorities are trying to dissuade former combatants of Free Aceh Movements (GAM) from their desire to join the Islamic State group, Indonesia’s counter-terrorism chief has said.

Local media reported this week that Fakhruddin Bin Kaseem also known as Din Robot, a former commander of the now-defunct separatist group and dozens of his comrades have expressed willingness to join Islamic State for economic reasons.

“It’s their rights, but we are trying to find a solution, through dialogue to give them understanding,” Saud Usman Nasution, chief of the National Counter-Terrorism Agency, said Wednesday.

He was speaking at the launch of books on de-radicalisation written by an Egyptian scholar, Abdul Mon’em Moneb, a reformed Muslim radical.

The former separatists have reportedly complained about economic hardships and a widening social and economic gap among GAM veterans.

“Our legal basis is quite weak [to deal with] who join ISIS. So we are strengthening prevention efforts through dialogue to make people understand [about ISIS],” Saud said.

According to the 2003 law on counter-terrorism, a person can only be charged if there is material evidence that he is planning to carry out a terrorist attack.

The government and GAM rebels signed a peace agreement in 2005, ending decades of conflict that claimed an estimated 15,000 people, mostly civilians.

Saud refused to blame the former combatants’ intention to join IS on the government’s failure to reintegrate them to society. But he acknowledged that some of the former guerrillas had complained that their lives had not improved since laying down their weapons.

“The problem is their welfare and nothing else. It is an individual matter and depends on the mindset. Some of them have succeeded to reintegrate,” Saud said.

Other former comrades have risen to become the province’s top bureaucrats and members of the local elite, including Governor Zaini Abdullah and his deputy Muzakkir Manaf. Authorities say about 300-500 Indonesians have joined Islamic State and at least three are known to have died in combat, including a police officer from Jambi province identified as Syahputra.

Kamaruddin, a deputy chairman of Aceh Party comprised of former GAM combatants, brushed aside the issue, saying that as an ex guerrilla, it would be very difficult for Fakhruddin go to Syria.

“On behalf [former] combatants, what is reported in newspapers in Aceh is a slander. There is no way Din Robot is going to join ISIS. It’s not as easy as he says,” Kamaruddin told CNN Indonesia Tuesday.

Counter-terrorism chief acknowledges death of policeman fighting for IS

Indonesia’s counter-terrorism chief has confirmed the death of a police sergeant who fought alongside the Islamic State group in Syria. Continue reading “Counter-terrorism chief acknowledges death of policeman fighting for IS”